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Questions on English grammar
6 posts • Page 1 of 1
 
18.09.2012 15:33:51

Capitalization

 
by FrazzledTranslator
Hi,

Capitalization again: I get both upper and lower case for "chair professor", (Lehrstuhl für Geschichte), what would you prefer?

TIA
FrazzledTranslator
 
19.09.2012 22:45:46

chair porfessor; Lehrstuhl für Geschichte

 
by [PONS] yakyuyama
Posts: 306
Joined: 16.12.2011 12:45:19
Hey FrazzledTranslator,

How about giving us the words you need (chair professor/Lehrstuhl für Geschichte) in context? Then it will probably be a lot easier for us to answer your question.

Cheers,
Yama
 
20.09.2012 11:17:53

Re: Capitalization

 
by [PONS] Ponsomime
Posts: 139
Joined: 07.10.2011 15:13:24
Hi FrazzledTranslator,

yakyuyama’s right – context is all.

I’d say that in general, if it’s used as a title then it should be upper-case. If it’s just the name of the job, then lower case.

There’s an article on this here that might help; http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/capitalization/capitalization-of-job-titles.html

P
 
20.09.2012 15:56:48

Re: Capitalization

 
by FrazzledTranslator
Hi Yama, Hi Ponsomime,

Here's the sentence I was talking about:

"Umso erfreulicher ist es, dass sich der Lehrstuhlinhaber für Geschichte, Theorie und Ethik an der Universität XX diesm Thema in so umfassender und verständlicher Weise widmet."

Thanks and Rrgards,
FrazzledTranslators
 
21.09.2012 20:10:45

Re: Capitalization

 
by [PONS] yakyuyama
Posts: 306
Joined: 16.12.2011 12:45:19
Hey FrazzledTranslator,

Thanks for the context. That certainly helps!

In the case you quoted, I'd say, as Ponsomime suggests, that you should go with upper-case letters for that job title.

Cheers,
Yama
 
23.09.2012 13:51:44

Re: Capitalization

 
by [PONS] Ponsomime
Posts: 139
Joined: 07.10.2011 15:13:24
Hi FrazzledTranslator,

The Guardian Style Guide (http://www.guardian.co.uk/styleguide/c) suggests;

"jobs all lc, eg prime minister, US secretary of state, chief rabbi, editor of the Guardian.

titles cap up titles, but not job description, eg President Barack Obama (but the US president, Barack Obama, and Obama on subsequent mention); the Duke of Westminster (the duke at second mention); Pope Benedict XVI but the pope."


While The Economist (http://www.economist.com/style-guide/capitals) says;

“All office-holders when referred to merely by their office, not by their name, are lower case: the chancellor of the exchequer, the foreign secretary, the prime minister, the speaker, the treasury secretary, the president of the United States, the chairman of Coca-Cola.

The only exceptions are
(1) a few titles that would look unduly peculiar without capitals, eg, Black Rod, Master of the Rolls, Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster, Lord Privy Seal, Lord Chancellor.
(2) a few exalted people, such as the Dalai Lama and the Aga Khan. Also God and the Prophet.
Some titles serve as names, and therefore have initial capitals, though they also serve as descriptions: the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Emir of Kuwait, the Shah of Iran. If you want to describe the office rather than the individual, use lower case: The next archbishop of Canterbury will be a woman. Since the demise of the ninth duke, there has never been another duke of Portland.

Hope that helps,

P
 
 

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